IHPE – DELMOTTE Jean english

JeanIHPE UMR 5244
Université de Montpellier
Place Eugène Bataillon CC 80
F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5
Tel +33(0)4-67-14-37-26
Fax +33(0)4-67-14-46-22
email : jdelmott@ifremer.fr
POSITION:Ph.D student
THESIS DIRECTORS: Jean-Michel ESCOUBAS
TEAM: MIMM
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THESIS SUBJECT:
Characterization of the diversity and dynamics of the Crassostrea gigas virome and analysis of its interaction with the antiviral response of the oyster
KEYWORDS:
Biotic interactions – Bioinformatic – Holobiont – Oyster – Antiviral immunity – Viral community
THESIS PROJECT:
Since 2008, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has experienced massive recurrent mortalities that threaten the French oyster farming industry. These mortalities of complex etiology have been associated in particular with bacterial (Vibrio genus) and viral (herpes type, OsHV-1 μVar) infections. The major economic and environmental consequences of this phenomenon for the oyster aquaculture have motivated the development of research axes within our laboratory in order to identify the key factors involved in the outbreak of the disease. In particular, the role of the oyster genetic backgrounds and environment in the structuration of the microbial community they host (projects: ANR Decipher, Hemo-microbiote, Amigo). These studies reveal the predominant role of OsHV-1 μVar viruses in the onset of the disease, but metagenomic approaches have also revealed the presence of other viruses potentially pathogenic for the oyster (e.g. Picornaviridae) or for its microbiota (e.g. bacteriophages). These preliminary results suggest the existence of a complex viral community associated with oysters. Viruses are known to be powerful modulators of microbial populations via their pathogenicity but also through their ability to transfer genetic material and reprogram the metabolism of their hosts. These studies highlight the need to (i) better characterize the diversity and dynamics of the oyster-associated viral communities and (ii) deepen the study of the mechanisms of interaction between the host’s antiviral immunity and its microbiota.
RESUME:
2017-present Ph.D student (Montpellier, France)
2017-  Master Immunology, Advanced Immunology (Paris, France)
2016- Master Immunology, Microbiology, Virology, Infectiology (Paris, France)
2014-2015 Bachelor Degree: Biochemistry, Biology, Bioinformatics (Paris, France)
PUBLICATION IN THE LAB: link